Category Archives: Inspiration

Posts that potentially inspire gaming, terrain or other projects. Period photos or graphics, amazing gaming creativity elsewhere, and such.

io9 covers WW1, interwar, and WW2 European pulp

io9, source of much pulpy goodness such as the Tozo comic, has turned its attention to European pulp, covering the period from 1914 all the way through to the end of World War 2 in 1945. Oh the planetary romance, the zombies, and the rise of facism. All is covered within. Just check out the image to the right. It has zeppelins!

An LPL3 Archive

As discussed in my last post on entering LAF‘s LPL5, here’s all ten of the images from my 2009 LPL3 entries. I finished somewhere in the bottom third of the pack, but certainly didn’t enter with any expectation of doing much better — I entered to give me incentive to work on my painting and photography, which worked out just fine!

LPL3’s bonus rounds were “Germans” for Round One, which I botched; the German WW1 stormtroopers I did for Round 7 were supposed to be my Round 1 bonus entry, but I ordered them too late. Round 5 was “Cavalry”, which I managed with my first 15mm fantasy unit painted in years. Round 10 was “Lost Worlds”, bonus points for an exploration team, a “native” team and “monster” or similar — pegged max bonus points there, and a photo I’m still proud of!

The entirety of LPL3 is still archived over on LAF.

Gallery: Shipyard Photos for Inspiration

Another revival from the old Brian’s Wargame Pages version of the site, and one that I should have brought forward ages ago! You can see the Esquimalt Drydock on Google Maps for a sense of scale that wasn’t available ten years ago when I first posted the photos. — Brian, 22 Feb 2011

In the summer of 2001 I was roommates with a guy who worked in the drydock here in town. He turned into a real asshole after being laid off, but while he was still working he gave me a tour of the yard. I brought my camera, and these pics should inspire people looking for new industrial modern or SF scenery projects!

One thing that would be very difficult to reproduce on the gaming table, except maybe in 6mm, would be the sheer scale of the place. I didn’t have my wide-angle lens with me, so I didn’t even try for some real area photos. The drydock itself is 1100 feet long; the two big cranes pictured below are several hundred feet tall. There were two fair-sized ships in the drydock when I was there, and they could have accomodated a third with no difficulty. And this isn’t even that big a drydock, by maritime engineering standards. The ones that can accomodate nuclear-powered aircraft carriers are even bigger…

Wargamers interested in industrial scenery or future-tech industrial landscapes (Necromunda style) should find plenty of inspiration here! Even if you can’t reproduce the scale, the clutter, details and fixtures should provide some ideas.

Click any image below for a (slightly) larger view. Keep in mind these are refugees from the Old Web, when 600px wide was a Big Image.

1920’s Egypt in colour

A woman sits with her fruits for sale. Photo Credit: Gervais Courtellemont and W. Robert Moore for National Geographic
A woman sits with her fruits for sale. Photo Credit: Gervais Courtellemont and W. Robert Moore for National Geographic

Egypt, much in the news today as it was in the 1920s when these pictures were taken, is the focus of this photo collection: Egypt in the 1920’s in colour (from How to be a Retronaut). in 1919 a major revolution had occurred, which led to a unilateral declaration of Egyptian independence in 1922 by the British government, which in turn led to the successive revolutions of 1952 and 2011. Actions begetting actions. Despite that, the Egypt of these pictures appears little changed by the millenia of history that have washed over it.

Once you are done, I suggest you see SatNav c. 1930 and the wonderfully-human Australian criminals of the 1920s. Lastly, have a wander through their entire 20s and 30s sections for glimpses at a past gone.

Pulp Design Tools & Resources, Part Three: Inspiration

Infection Is Avoided...
A 1930s WPA job-safety poster. Via x-ray_delta_one on Flickr.

A necessarily brief, personal and idiosyncratic tour through some websites with noteworthy archives of 1920s/30s posters, postcards, luggage tags and other graphics. Some photos, some stuff that’s technically outside our chosen era but still cool, and far too short, but enjoy, be inspired, and get a feel for the graphics of the pulp era!

Part One of this series introduced Inkscape. Part Two talked about design, typography & fonts.

The American Library of Congress WPA Posters collection, part of their American Memory project, is huge but not that easy to navigate. Start with the Collection Highlights tour, then just start hitting random keywords or subjects to find gems like Yellowstone Park posters, injunctions to clean up your trash, and even hippos. The WPA was the Works Progress Administration, part of the whole New Deal aimed at keeping Americans employed and maintaining national morale during the Great Depression. There was a whole wing of the WPA dedicated to encouraging the arts, including the graphic arts. Hence the really cool posters.
Continue reading Pulp Design Tools & Resources, Part Three: Inspiration

A Classic Lost World Image

Via x-ray delta one on Flickr, this image (no source is given) is a classic “Lost World” illustration!

... garden tour gone bad!

I want a 28mm miniature of the guy on the left in the front, with bandaged head and machete! (I have lots of mighty hunter types with guns, but a shortage of assisstants, helpers, native guides and flunkies to fill out the rest of the safari party…)

Click through to Flickr for larger verisons. Lots of other neat pulpish and 20s/30s images on x-ray delta one’s photostream, too. Well worth checking out! Posted under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.